The Last Man Who Knew Every thing: The Life and Times of.
Andrew Robinson is a King’s Scholar of Eton College and holds degrees from Oxford University (in science) and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. He is the author of more than a dozen books including four biographies: Einstein: A

Andrew Robinson is a King’s Scholar of Eton College and holds degrees from Oxford University (in science) and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. He is the author of more than a dozen books including four biographies: Einstein: A Hundred Years of Relativity ; The Man Who Deciphered Linear B: The Story of Michael Ventris ; Satyajit Ray: The Inner Eye ; and Rabindranath Tagore: The Myriad-Minded Man (written with Krishna Dutta). Since 1994, he has been the literary editor of The Times Higher Education Supplement in London.

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20.01.2007  · PD Smith champions Thomas Young, a great unknown and the subject of Andrew Robinson's The Last Man Who Knew Everything.

The Last Man Who Knew Everything: Thomas Young, The Anonymous Polymath Who Proved Newton Wrong, Explained How We See, …

Has anyone ever known everything there was to know? Who was the last person to have read every book in existence? Believe it or not, this is a hotly debated question ...

Andrew Robinson is a King’s Scholar of Eton College and holds degrees from Oxford University (in science) and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. He is the author of more than a dozen books including four biographies: Einstein: A Hundred Years of Relativity ; The Man Who Deciphered Linear B: The Story of Michael Ventris ; Satyajit Ray: The Inner Eye ; and Rabindranath Tagore: The Myriad-Minded Man (written with Krishna Dutta). Since 1994, he has been the literary editor of The Times Higher Education Supplement in London.

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If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support ?

Andrew Robinson is a King’s Scholar of Eton College and holds degrees from Oxford University (in science) and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. He is the author of more than a dozen books including four biographies: Einstein: A Hundred Years of Relativity ; The Man Who Deciphered Linear B: The Story of Michael Ventris ; Satyajit Ray: The Inner Eye ; and Rabindranath Tagore: The Myriad-Minded Man (written with Krishna Dutta). Since 1994, he has been the literary editor of The Times Higher Education Supplement in London.

Would you like to tell us about a lower price ?
If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support ?

20.01.2007  · PD Smith champions Thomas Young, a great unknown and the subject of Andrew Robinson's The Last Man Who Knew Everything.

The Last Man Who Knew Everything: Thomas Young, The Anonymous Polymath Who Proved Newton Wrong, Explained How We See, …

Has anyone ever known everything there was to know? Who was the last person to have read every book in existence? Believe it or not, this is a hotly debated question ...

As a biographer, Andrew Robinson has always been fascinated by "versatile people" such as Einstein, Michael Ventris (the architect who also deciphered the first European writing system) and the Indian writer Rabindranath Tagore. But Thomas Young "beats them all".

In physics, he had the temerity to contradict Newton and propose a wave theory of light. In physiology, he made significant advances in understanding the mechanisms of the eye, explaining how it focuses, defining astigmatism, and proposing the three-colour theory of how the retina detects the sensation of colour. The latter was finally confirmed in 1959 and was described by a modern scientist as "surely the most prescient work in all of psychophysics".

In the field of engineering, "Young's modulus" is a measure of elasticity that explains how different materials contract or expand. Egyptologists hail Young as one of the founders of their science. He provided key insights into deciphering the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs on the Rosetta stone. In medicine (the one subject in which he received formal training) he also distinguished himself. In music, "Young's temperament" is a technique for tuning keyboard instruments. From languages (he coined the term Indo-European after a comparative analysis of 400 languages) to carpentry and life insurance, Young's incisive intellect has left its mark on countless disciplines.

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Andrew Robinson is a King’s Scholar of Eton College and holds degrees from Oxford University (in science) and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. He is the author of more than a dozen books including four biographies: Einstein: A Hundred Years of Relativity ; The Man Who Deciphered Linear B: The Story of Michael Ventris ; Satyajit Ray: The Inner Eye ; and Rabindranath Tagore: The Myriad-Minded Man (written with Krishna Dutta). Since 1994, he has been the literary editor of The Times Higher Education Supplement in London.

Would you like to tell us about a lower price ?
If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support ?

20.01.2007  · PD Smith champions Thomas Young, a great unknown and the subject of Andrew Robinson's The Last Man Who Knew Everything.

The Last Man Who Knew Everything: Thomas Young, The Anonymous Polymath Who Proved Newton Wrong, Explained How We See, …

Has anyone ever known everything there was to know? Who was the last person to have read every book in existence? Believe it or not, this is a hotly debated question ...

As a biographer, Andrew Robinson has always been fascinated by "versatile people" such as Einstein, Michael Ventris (the architect who also deciphered the first European writing system) and the Indian writer Rabindranath Tagore. But Thomas Young "beats them all".

In physics, he had the temerity to contradict Newton and propose a wave theory of light. In physiology, he made significant advances in understanding the mechanisms of the eye, explaining how it focuses, defining astigmatism, and proposing the three-colour theory of how the retina detects the sensation of colour. The latter was finally confirmed in 1959 and was described by a modern scientist as "surely the most prescient work in all of psychophysics".

In the field of engineering, "Young's modulus" is a measure of elasticity that explains how different materials contract or expand. Egyptologists hail Young as one of the founders of their science. He provided key insights into deciphering the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs on the Rosetta stone. In medicine (the one subject in which he received formal training) he also distinguished himself. In music, "Young's temperament" is a technique for tuning keyboard instruments. From languages (he coined the term Indo-European after a comparative analysis of 400 languages) to carpentry and life insurance, Young's incisive intellect has left its mark on countless disciplines.

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