The Wild Swans (Video 1994) - IMDb
This story is another one of those stories that is going to sound really familiar. There are at least a couple Grimm’s Fairy Tales that sound an awfully lot like this story, or the other way around.Once upon a time there was a king who had twelve

This story is another one of those stories that is going to sound really familiar. There are at least a couple Grimm’s Fairy Tales that sound an awfully lot like this story, or the other way around.

Once upon a time there was a king who had twelve children. His wife was dead. The oldest eleven were boys and the youngest was a girl named Eliza. The king married again, but his new wife did not like his children. On the wedding day she gave the children a cup and told them to pretend it was cake. She soon sent Eliza off to live with a peasant family and convinced the king that his sons were no good. She turned them into swans. They had all been very good children, so there was really no reason for any of this.

The queen then decided to go another route. She rubbed walnut oil into Eliza’s skin and messed up her hair. She made Eliza ugly. The king said that this was not his daughter and sent her away. Eliza walked and walked and walked. She walked in the dark with the animals and dreamed about her brothers. She came to a lake and looked at herself. She was ugly. She washed herself off and became a beautiful princess again. Eliza came upon an old woman the next day. She asked the woman if she had seen eleven princes riding through the forest and the old woman said, no, but she had seen some swans with crowns on their heads. She gave Eliza some berries.

This story is another one of those stories that is going to sound really familiar. There are at least a couple Grimm’s Fairy Tales that sound an awfully lot like this story, or the other way around.

Once upon a time there was a king who had twelve children. His wife was dead. The oldest eleven were boys and the youngest was a girl named Eliza. The king married again, but his new wife did not like his children. On the wedding day she gave the children a cup and told them to pretend it was cake. She soon sent Eliza off to live with a peasant family and convinced the king that his sons were no good. She turned them into swans. They had all been very good children, so there was really no reason for any of this.

The queen then decided to go another route. She rubbed walnut oil into Eliza’s skin and messed up her hair. She made Eliza ugly. The king said that this was not his daughter and sent her away. Eliza walked and walked and walked. She walked in the dark with the animals and dreamed about her brothers. She came to a lake and looked at herself. She was ugly. She washed herself off and became a beautiful princess again. Eliza came upon an old woman the next day. She asked the woman if she had seen eleven princes riding through the forest and the old woman said, no, but she had seen some swans with crowns on their heads. She gave Eliza some berries.

This is a fascinating history of 20th century China through the lives of three women, Jung Chang, her mother, and her grandmother. Of course it only tells their perspectives, but all are glimpses of China I have never seen so clearly. If I had picked up a history book of this era, I would have probably put it down, too frustrated by the Communist regime to continue. Through this narration, I cared about what happened to Jung Chang's family and the country and couldn't put it down (I listened to the audible version and read when sitting down.).

Briefly, Chang's grandmother, sold as a concubine, lives through the Japanese occupation of Manchuria, the Kuomintang, Mao's takeover of Manchuria, and follows the lives of her daughter and grandchildren. Her mother is raised on Mao's schools and propaganda and rises through the ranks of the Communist system with her husband, later to be renounced in the Cultural Revolution. Chang and her siblings struggle to learn and thrive during the Cultural Revolution, always challenging.

Jung Chang's writing is very straightforward (as is the narration), which is absolutely appropriate for this epic story already so full of extreme events and emotions. Lyricism is not needed and extra description would have made this book too long. Despite the length of this book (562 pages), there was never a sense of it being slow or too long. The narration by Joy Osmanski also generally moved swiftly and clearly (at 1.25 speed).

Disclaimer: All recognizable characters are the property of Stephenie Meyer. Any other copyrighted or trademarked items mentioned herein belong to their respective owners, all other content belongs to me. No copyright infringement is intended. No copying or reproduction of this work is permitted without my express written authorization.

I placed my key card on the entry table and grabbed the handle of my satchel. My eyes locked on his as he held the doors open for me.

I couldn't manage any words. I was all talked out. I closed my eyes and gave him a slight nod in acknowledgment as I stepped into the waiting elevator. The heavy doors slid closed, and I began my descent, surprised I didn't feel more pain, but then again, my heart was so numb I doubted much could make me feel anything now.

This story is another one of those stories that is going to sound really familiar. There are at least a couple Grimm’s Fairy Tales that sound an awfully lot like this story, or the other way around.

Once upon a time there was a king who had twelve children. His wife was dead. The oldest eleven were boys and the youngest was a girl named Eliza. The king married again, but his new wife did not like his children. On the wedding day she gave the children a cup and told them to pretend it was cake. She soon sent Eliza off to live with a peasant family and convinced the king that his sons were no good. She turned them into swans. They had all been very good children, so there was really no reason for any of this.

The queen then decided to go another route. She rubbed walnut oil into Eliza’s skin and messed up her hair. She made Eliza ugly. The king said that this was not his daughter and sent her away. Eliza walked and walked and walked. She walked in the dark with the animals and dreamed about her brothers. She came to a lake and looked at herself. She was ugly. She washed herself off and became a beautiful princess again. Eliza came upon an old woman the next day. She asked the woman if she had seen eleven princes riding through the forest and the old woman said, no, but she had seen some swans with crowns on their heads. She gave Eliza some berries.

This is a fascinating history of 20th century China through the lives of three women, Jung Chang, her mother, and her grandmother. Of course it only tells their perspectives, but all are glimpses of China I have never seen so clearly. If I had picked up a history book of this era, I would have probably put it down, too frustrated by the Communist regime to continue. Through this narration, I cared about what happened to Jung Chang's family and the country and couldn't put it down (I listened to the audible version and read when sitting down.).

Briefly, Chang's grandmother, sold as a concubine, lives through the Japanese occupation of Manchuria, the Kuomintang, Mao's takeover of Manchuria, and follows the lives of her daughter and grandchildren. Her mother is raised on Mao's schools and propaganda and rises through the ranks of the Communist system with her husband, later to be renounced in the Cultural Revolution. Chang and her siblings struggle to learn and thrive during the Cultural Revolution, always challenging.

Jung Chang's writing is very straightforward (as is the narration), which is absolutely appropriate for this epic story already so full of extreme events and emotions. Lyricism is not needed and extra description would have made this book too long. Despite the length of this book (562 pages), there was never a sense of it being slow or too long. The narration by Joy Osmanski also generally moved swiftly and clearly (at 1.25 speed).

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